Earth and Space

Year 5

Unit Overview

Journey through space, the final frontier. Navigate beyond the Sun, the magnificent, blazing star at the centre of our Solar System. Investigate the eight planets: Mercury, Venus, Earth, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune. Take a look at the Moon, a celestial body that orbits Earth. Compare the times of day at different places on the Earth. Exploring space is probably the greatest adventure that humankind has ever undertaken. Are we alone? Or are there other life forms out there?

❇ MEMORABLE MOMENT

To complete a series of investigations.

️✏️ WRITING OPPORTUNITIES

Write a narrative based on the short film 'One Small Step'.

Write a journal based on a trapped astronaut in Mars Transmission.

🌳 LEARNING OUTSIDE THE CLASSROOM

Creating a scaled diagram of the planets on the playground.

Unit Sequence: Learning Intentions

  1. To use test results to make predictions to set up further comparative and fair tests.

  2. To report and present findings from enquiries, including conclusions, causal relationships and explanations of and degree of trust in results, in oral and written forms such as displays and other presentations.

  3. To identify scientific evidence that has been used to support or refute ideas or arguments.

  4. To describe the Sun, Earth and Moon as approximately spherical bodies.

  5. To use the idea of the Earth’s rotation to explain day and night and the apparent movement of the sun across the sky.

  6. To describe the movement of the Moon relative to the Earth.

  7. To take measurements, using a range of scientific equipment, with increasing accuracy and precision, taking repeat readings when appropriate.

  8. To record data and results of increasing complexity using scientific diagrams and labels, classification keys, tables, scatter graphs, bar and line graphs.

  9. To explain that unsupported objects fall towards the Earth because of the force of gravity acting between the Earth and the falling object.

  10. To plan different types of scientific enquiries to answer questions, including recognising and controlling variables where necessary.

Scientific Enquiry: Investigations

  1. How do we know the earth is round?

    • To use test results to make predictions to set up further comparative and fair tests.

    • To report and present findings from enquiries, including conclusions, causal relationships and explanations of and degree of trust in results, in oral and written forms such as displays and other presentations.

    • To identify scientific evidence that has been used to support or refute ideas or arguments.

    • To describe the Sun, Earth and Moon as approximately spherical bodies.

  2. Can we track the sun?

    • To use test results to make predictions to set up further comparative and fair tests.

    • To report and present findings from enquiries, including conclusions, causal relationships and explanations of and degree of trust in results, in oral and written forms such as displays and other presentations.

    • To identify scientific evidence that has been used to support or refute ideas or arguments.

    • To use the idea of the Earth’s rotation to explain day and night and the apparent movement of the sun across the sky.

  3. How does the moon move?

    • To use test results to make predictions to set up further comparative and fair tests.

    • To report and present findings from enquiries, including conclusions, causal relationships and explanations of and degree of trust in results, in oral and written forms such as displays and other presentations.

    • To identify scientific evidence that has been used to support or refute ideas or arguments.

    • To describe the movement of the Earth, and other planets, relative to the Sun in the solar system.

    • To describe the movement of the Moon relative to the Earth.

🏁 BIG FINISH

To investigate craters.

πŸ“– FOCUS TEXT(S)

Northern Lights by Philip Pullman